Biomedical and Health Informatics Leaders Convene to Present Innovative Science, Cutting-edge Health Information Technologies

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Washington, DC — The advance program for AMIA’s 35th Annual Symposium on Biomedical and Health Informatics previews a robust educational and scientific event (15 themed tracks of content) that enables scientists, academics, government leaders, and industry professionals to share their research findings, innovative informatics methods, and creative technologies, and to continue fueling the expansion of the burgeoning field of informatics as it applies to biomedicine and health. Last year’s Symposium attracted approximately 2,500 professionals active in the field. AMIA (American Medical Informatics Association), the leading association for informatics professionals, is expecting a higher number of attendees this year.

The AMIA Symposium launches Oct. 22-23 with a series of tutorials for professionals who wish to deepen their understanding in any of 26 topics critical to informatics, such as clinical data research, intellectual property, personal health records, natural language processing, biomedical ontologies, health IT standards, data mining, translational bioinformatics, clinical decision support, and privacy and security. Eight focused workshops also will be held Oct. 22. Three keynote addresses include an opening keynote from Francis Collins, MD, director of the National Institutes of Health (Oct. 23, 1 pm) and talks by Gregory Abowd, PhD, Georgia Tech (Oct. 24, 8:30 am) and Farzad Mostashari, MD, National Coordinator for Health Information Technology/U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services (Oct. 26, 12:15 pm). Ninety-nine scientific sessions and dozens of posters will be presented during the Symposium.

"Informatics in biomedicine and health care holds the potential to improve health for individuals and populations, nationally and globally. Informatics and health IT are changing the world by changing the way research is conducted, the way research is translated into health promotion and health care, how clinical decision support is provided, and how healthcare is both delivered and managed," says Edward H. Shortliffe, MD, PhD, FACMI, AMIA’s president and CEO. "AMIA’s Annual Symposium has become the nucleus of informatics information and activity, providing a central point of connection for breakthrough science and applications."

Five late-breaking sessions on the hottest, most timely topics will be announced in early October, prior to the Symposium’s opening. AMIA TV, broadcast onsite at the Symposium, highlights informatics training and educational programs operating throughout the country at leading academic institutions that form AMIA’s Academic Forum.

Registration for scientists and other related professionals is available online at www.amia.org/amia2011. Journalists are invited to cover the keynotes and to attend sessions cost-free. Media attendees may register online at www.amia.org/amia2011-media-registration.

AMIA is the center of action for 4,000 informatics professionals from more than 65 countries. As the voice of the nation’s top biomedical and health informatics professionals, AMIA and its members play a leading role in moving basic research findings from bench to bedside, evaluating interventions across communities, assessing the affect of health innovations on health policy, and advancing the field of informatics. As demonstrated at its Annual Symposium, AMIA actively supports five domains in informatics: translational bioinformatics, clinical research informatics, clinical informatics, consumer health informatics, and public health informatics.

For more information, contact:
Nancy Light
301-657-5903
nlight@amia.org