Education

Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

AMIA’s Role in MOC for the Clinical Informatics Subspecialty

AMIA is the Premier Provider of MOC-II Activities in Informatics

AMIA creates high-quality MOC activities for clinical informatics diplomates board-certified by either the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) or the American Board of Pathology (ABPath).

AMIA’s current MOC offerings include:

Earn MOC II Credit at AMIA Meetings

Two of our major meetings each year offer MOC-II/LLSA credits to all diplomates:

In compliance with ABPM and ABPath requirements, AMIA’s MOC-II/LLSA activities offer self-assessment questions to the diplomate, who is then able to gauge what he or she learned in each session.

AMIA offers four MCQs per hour of instruction so that diplomates of both boards may earn MOC-II/LLSA credit.

AMIA provides reports on diplomates’ MOC-II credits earned to the respective boards.

Diplomates from ABPM and ABPath Use AMIA-vetted MOC-II Assessments

AMIA grounds our MCQ process in the format prescribed by the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME), the authority that provides guidance on creating valid assessment questions for high-stakes exams. 

Creating the MCQs for our MOC program involves a rigorous review process by AMIA’s MOC Committee. These subject matter experts are committed to helping create challenging yet clearly-written MCQs that test knowledge gained per educational session. AMIA’s MCQs also serve as a valuable take-away resource for review and reinforcement for continued learning.

ABPM Diplomates and Satisfying the MOC-IV/IMP through AMIA

Diplomates board-certified through the ABPM must complete one of their Improvement in Medical Practice (IMP) activities through AMIA during each 10-year reaccreditation cycle.

This IMP, or MOC-IV project, may take the form of a quality improvement/performance improvement activity, or it may be a 360-degree evaluation. Download the template for completing this project.

Diplomates who are ready to engage in this project should:

  • Review the template and reflect on a project that would demonstrate performance or quality improvement using clinical informatics
  • Engage in the PI/QI project, completing all of the fields in the template; the actual project should take at least three months to complete
  • Purchase access to the AMIA MOC-IV online submission by logging in to their account at amia.org, clicking “Online Store,” and clicking “MOC-IV Project” under Events
  • Use your completed MOC-IV data collection template to input the data into the online form
  • Email MOC4@amia.org to let us know you’ve submitted your project; AMIA then puts it into review by the MOC Committee, informs you if it has been approved, and communicates with the ABPM that you have satisfied this requirement 

Note: You may contact AMIA’s Director of Education at MOC4@amia.org for instructions on completing the 360-degree evaluation version of the MOC-IV project, or with any other questions.

Look for AMIA online MOC-II activities by Q4 2018.


Who Determines the Rules for MOC and the Clinical Informatics Subspecialty?

Each of the ABMS’s 24 member boards determines the MOC requirements for its physicians.

The ABPM and the ABPath equally share defining certification requirements in the subspecialty of clinical informatics. Each of these two boards determines the MOC requirements for its diplomates certified in clinical informatics.

The ABPM’s MOC requirements for board-certified clinical informaticians are (Figures 1 and 2 provided by the ABPM):

TO MAINTAIN YOUR CERTIFICATION IN 2024-2025

Part I: Professionalism & Professional Standing

Hold an active, valid, and unrestricted medical license in all States, US Territories, or Canadian Provinces in which you are licensed to practice medicine.

Part II: Lifelong Learning & Self-Assessment (LLSA)

Earn a total of 175 Continuing Medical Education (CME) credits over the ten-year span of certification, including a minimum of 70 ABPM-approved LLSA credits.
Completion of MOC Part II requirements of another ABMS Member Board may count as 150 CME credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements, so that only 100 LLSA credits need to be completed.

Complete a patient safety course in the first two years of each certification cycle.
Diplomates who have been certified by ABPM through the Residency Pathway do not need to complete an additional patient safety course during their first ten-year certification cycle if they completed residency training in 2012 and later.

Part III: Assessment of Knowledge, Judgment & Skills

Take the MOC exam in the last three years of your certification cycle. You may re-take the test if necessary to pass it prior to the expiration of your certificate.

Part IV: Improvement in Medical Practice (IMP)

Complete TWO IMP activities during each ten-year certification cycle. One activity is to be completed in the first five years of the cycle and a second in the last five years. Diplomates must complete at least one IMP activity through a Preventive Medicine specialty or subspecialty society (ACOEM, ACPM, AsMA, AMIA, UHMS). One IMP activity completed for Part IV requirements of another ABMS Member Board may be counted towards ABPM MOC Part IV.

Figure 1: For those diplomates in the 2024 and 2025 recertification cohort

TO MAINTAIN YOUR CERTIFICATION IN 2026 AND LATER

Part I: Professionalism & Professional Standing

Hold an active, valid, and unrestricted medical license in all States, US Territories, or Canadian Provinces in which you are licensed to practice medicine.

Part II: Lifelong Learning & Self-Assessment (LLSA)

Earn a total of 250 Continuing Medical Education (CME) credits over the ten-year span of certification, including a minimum of 100 ABPM-approved LLSA credits.
Completion of MOC Part II requirements of another ABMS Member Board may count as 150 CME credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements, so that only 100 LLSA credits need to be completed.

Complete a patient safety course in the first two years of each certification cycle.
Diplomates who have been certified by ABPM through the Residency Pathway do not need to complete an additional patient safety course during their first ten-year certification cycle if they completed residency training in 2012 and later.

Complete a patient safety course in the first two years of each certification cycle.
Diplomates who have been certified by ABPM through the Residency Pathway do not need to complete an additional patient safety course during their first ten-year certification cycle if they completed residency training in 2012 and later.

Part III: Assessment of Knowledge, Judgment & Skills

Take the MOC exam in the last three years of your certification cycle. You may re-take the test if necessary to pass it prior to the expiration of your certificate.

Part IV: Improvement in Medical Practice (IMP)

Complete three IMP activities during each ten-year certification cycle. One activity is to be completed in the first three years of the cycle, the second in the second three years, and the last in the final four years of the cycle. Diplomates must complete at least one IMP activity through a Preventive Medicine specialty or subspecialty society (ACOEM, ACPM, AsMA, AMIA, UHMS). A maximum of two IMP activities completed for Part IV requirements of another ABMS Member Board may be counted towards ABPM MOC Part IV.

Figure 2: For those diplomates in the 2026 and beyond recertification cohort

If you need more information, visit the ABPM site or email moc@theabpm.org

ABPath information on MOC is here.