Exploring medical device design and use through layers of Distributed Cognition

March 12, 2015
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:
EST
Fee: 
Member - Free, Non-member: $50
Presenters: 
Dominic Furniss, PhD - UCL Interaction Centre, University College London

The Evaluation working group (EVAL) and People and Organizational Issues working group (POI) are proud to co-sponsor the following webinar:

Medical devices are becoming more interconnected and complex. Modern devices are more able to transfer data through networked computing systems; their function is shaped by committees responsible for their design, procurement and configuration; and they are influenced by fragmented groups responsible for maintenance, quality control and training. This broadens the role of informatics when considering the performance of devices. We faced these issues when analyzing the design and use of an inpatient glucometer in context.

In this webinar I introduce DiCoT-CL as a framework to explore how medical devices are coupled to their context. DiCoT-CL facilitates the application of Distributed Cognition theory, making it more accessible to researchers and practitioners. Through applying DiCoT-CL I examine the underlying information architecture of the sociotechnical system that the medical device is embedded within. Essentially DiCoT is composed of five themes or models: information flow, artifacts, physical, social and evolutionary. Each of these has theoretical principles associated with it to encourage insight and reflection. DiCoT-CL adds concentric layers so the device can be considered with its user, in its immediate environment, at a ward level, and at a hospital-wide level. Hence, the framework encourages exploration about how the performance of the device is influenced by parts of the sociotechnical system that are near and faraway from the device’s actual use.

You should register for this webinar in order to gain an understanding of how to use the DiCoT-CL framework to explore how medical device performance is coupled to layers of sociotechnical context.

Learning Objectives

After viewing this webinar, the learner should be better able to:

  • Understand the perspective of ‘the medical device reaching out’ through layers of sociotechnical system, becoming interconnected with distant systems and influenced by dispersed groups
  • Explain Distributed Cognition, its applicability to informatics, and making it more accessible to researchers and practitioners
  • Understand DiCoT-CL: a framework to facilitate the application of Distributed Cognition to explore medical device design and use in context

Speaker Information

Dominic Furniss is a Research Associate at the UCL Interaction Centre, University College London. His research is concerned with understanding the design and use of medical devices in context, paying particular attention to the usability of technical systems and how these fit within the broader sociotechnical system. He focuses on qualitative analysis and has special interest in Distributed Cognition and Resilience Engineering. He is a researcher co-investigator on two projects: CHI+MED, a project looking at the usability of medical devices; and ECLIPSE, a project investigating the different intravenous infusion practices in the UK. Dr Furniss has a degree in Psychology and Philosophy from the University of Warwick, an MSc in HCI with Ergonomics from UCL, and a PhD in HCI and Human Factors from UCL.

Speaker Publishing Information

Published in: Journal of Biomedical Informatics; Cognition, Technology and Work; Applied Ergonomics; Journal of Clinical Risk; Human Computation; BMJ Quality & Safety; Interacting with Computers; Ergonomics.

Edited Books:

• Furniss, D., Randell, R., O’Kane, A., Taneva, S., Mentis, H. & Blandford, A. (Eds.).  (2015). Fieldwork for Healthcare: Guidance for investigating human factors in computing systems. Morgan & Claypool Publishers.
• Furniss, D., O’Kane, A., Randell, R., Taneva, S., Mentis, H. & Blandford, A. (Eds.).  (2014). Fieldwork for Healthcare: Case studies investigating human factors in computing systems. Morgan & Claypool Publishers.