2020 February JAMIA Journal Club Webinar

February 13, 2020
3:00PM
4:00PM
EDT
Fee: 
Free for AMIA members; $50 for non-members.
Presenters: 
Emily Powers, MD

Efficacy and unintended consequences of hard-stop alerts in electronic health record systems: a systematic review

Article Lead author Emily Powers will discuss this month's JAMIA Journal Club selection:

Powers E, Shiffman R, Melnick E, Hickner A, Sharifi M. Efficacy and unintended consequences of hard-stop alerts in electronic health record systems: a systematic review. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2018 Sept 18; 25(11):1556-1566. doi: 10.1093/jamia/ocy112. [Abstract]
 

Presenter

Emily Powers, MD
Clinical Fellow
Yale Pediatric Emergency Medicine
New Haven, CT

Dr. Powers is currently a fellow in pediatric emergency medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital and has an interest in clinical decision support and the role of physicians in data extraction for quality improvement purposes. She graduated in 2012 from Vanderbilt Medical School and completed a residency and chief residency in pediatrics at Yale New Haven Hospital followed by a fellowship in clinical informatics at Yale University where the primary focus of her research was examining the role of hard stop alerts in the electronic health record. She hopes to combine her informatics expertise with her clinical expertise in pediatric emergency medicine as she starts her faculty position in 2021. 

Format

  • 35-minute discussion between the authors and the JAMIA Student Editorial Board moderators including salient features of the published study and its potential impact on practice.
  • 25-minute discussion of questions submitted by listeners via the webinar tools and moderated by JAMIA Student Editorial Board members
JAMIA Journal Club managers and monthly moderators are JAMIA Student Editorial Board members:

Manager

Maryam Zolnoori, PhD, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Digital Health Sciences and Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN


Moderator

Mustafa Ibraheem Hussain, PhD Candidate, University of California, Irvine

 




Citation

The PubMed citation for the paper under discussion is:

Powers E, Shiffman R, Melnick E, Hickner A, Sharifi M. Efficacy and unintended consequences of hard-stop alerts in electronic health record systems: a systematic review. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2018 Sept 18; 25(11):1556-1566. doi: 10.1093/jamia/ocy112. [Abstract]

Student Access

Students who are not AMIA members, but whose academic institutions are members of the Academic Forum, are eligible for a complimentary JAMIA Journal Club registration. Please contact Susanne Arnold at susanne@amia.org for the discount code. In the email, please include: full name, Academic Department, and the primary Academic Forum representative of that Academic Department. Note that AMIA Student memberships are $50, which allow access to JAMIA, all JAMIA Journal Clubs, and other webinars of interest to the biomedical informatics community. 

Statement of Purpose

Clinical Decision Support in the form of alerts has increased exponentially in the era of meaningful use. An alert is now generated for 6-8% of all clinician-entered orders. These alerts have the capacity to provide useful information to clinicians at the point of care but their utility may be attenuated by unintended consequences such as alert fatigue or undesirable workarounds. Efforts at minimizing alert fatigue have included tiering alerts by importance and titrating the degree of interaction required by the clinician accordingly. Three different alert categories have arisen from these efforts: hard stops, soft stops, and passive alerts. We have sought with this systematic review to standardize the definition of these three types of alerts and then to ask three key questions of hard-stop alerts to better understand their appropriate application: (1) To what extent are hard-stop alerts effective in improving patient health and healthcare delivery outcomes? (2) What are the adverse events and unintended consequences of hard-stop alerts? (3) How do hard-stop alerts compare to soft-stop alerts?

Target Audience

The target audience for this activity is professionals and students interested in biomedical and health informatics.

Learning Objectives

The general learning objective for all of the JAMIA Journal Club webinars is that participants will

  • Use a critical appraisal process to assess article validity and to gauge article findings' relevance to practice

After this live activity, the participant should be better able to:

  • Define the three alert categories: Hard Stop, Soft Stop, and Passive Alerts
  • Explain the extent to which hard-stop alerts are effective in improving patient health and healthcare delivery outcomes.
  • Identify adverse events and unintended consequences of hard-stop alerts.
  • Compare hard-stop alerts to soft-stop alerts.

 

This JAMIA Journal Club does not offer continuing education credit.

In our dedication to providing unbiased education even when no CE credit is associated with it, we provide planners’ and presenters’ disclosure of relevant financial relationships with commercial interests that has the potential to introduce bias in the presentation: 

Disclosures for this Activity

These faculty, planners, and staff who are in a position to control the content of this activity disclose that they and their life partners have no relevant financial relationships with commercial interests: 

JAMIA Journal Club presenter: Emily Powers
JAMIA Journal Club planners: Michael Chiang, Mustafa Ibraheem Hussain, Maryam Zolnoori
AMIA staff: Susanne Arnold, Pesha Rubinstein

Contact Info

For questions about webinar access, email Susanne@amia.org.