Informatics Training Program at Duke University

Durham
United States

The Duke Center for Health Informatics is a multidisciplinary training and research organization dedicated to educating the next generation of health informaticists. Under the leadership of Dr. W. Ed Hammond, the center has developed a ground breaking curriculum that focuses on the aggregation, analysis, and use of health data to improve human health, both at Duke and across the globe. The Center is distinguished by a strong history in applied health and research informatics, a mission and vision of improving human health, a tight integration with Duke Health System operations and research programs, and an interdisciplinary curriculum and training environment.

Programs

Certificate in Health Informatics
Master of Interdisciplinary Data Science / Biomedical Informatics concentration
Master’s of Science in Nursing-Informatics Specialty
Master of Management in Clinical Informatics
PhD in Nursing - Informatics Specialty
Doctor of Nursing Practice - Informatics Specialty

Degree and Certificate Programs

The Master of Interdisciplinary Data Science / Biomedical Informatics concentration is a two-year on-campus program comprised of one year of data science courses, one year of biomedical informatics courses, and a one-year Capstone project that will provide students with the opportunity for technical training  in ongoing informatics projects using their newly learned knowledge.

The Master’s of Science in Nursing, open to nurses, is a two-year distance education program. The Certificate program, also distance education, is a one year program that admits candidates with (1) a bachelor’s degree or higher in a healthcare field or (2) a bachelor’s degree or higher and at least one year of relevant experience in a healthcare setting.

The Master of Management in Clinical Informatics is a one year, week-end program with classes taught on campus; this program combines business and informatics classes that prepare students for leadership in information intense healthcare fields.

The Duke School of Nursing offers both PhD and DNP programs with a concentration in informatics. Students must have a bachelor’s degree in nursing.

Students benefit from faculty and staff with informatics expertise and research-related fields at Duke that include:

  • Clinical Decision Support and Knowledge Management
  • Clinical Research Informatics
  • Computerized Patient Safety Systems
  • Genomic and Personalized Medicine
  • Geospatial Informatics
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Imaging Informatics
  • Patient Centered Care
  • Population Health
  • Secondary Data Use to Improve Care and Care Outcomes
  • Data Quality
  • Standards

Short Course

The Duke Health Informatics Short Course is designed for organizations and companies that want to provide a comprehensive overview of Health Informatics to their employees. Courses are tailored to the organization's needs, and provide 3-7 days of a high-level view of informatics and an opportunity for "deep dive" content.

Taught by leading informaticists from Duke’s Health System and Research Institutes, attendees will benefit from Duke’s forty-year history of achievement in applied health and research informatics, a mission and vision of improving human health, a tight integration with health system operations and research programs, and an interdisciplinary curriculum and training environment. The target audience for the Short Course includes:

  • People from all backgrounds who want to learn more about the field of Health Informatics. Prior knowledge about health informatics is not required.
  • Individuals in healthcare who have general knowledge about informatics but would like to deepen their expertise.
  • Individuals who are interested in learning how to apply and incorporate informatics solutions.

Key focus areas include but not limited to:

  • An overview of health informatics methods and topics.
  • Principles behind the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of Electronic Health Records (EHRs), information and imaging systems in today’s healthcare settings.
  • Applications of clinical data warehouse analytics and approaches for secondary data use such as registries, clinical research, Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER), health quality improvement, population, and public health.
  • Leading methods for bridging research and patient care and leveraging informatics to expedite clinical and translational research
  • Understanding the basic principles for advancing genomic and personalized medicine.
  • Hands on projects using case studies will be conducted to apply knowledge obtained during the course.

For more information contact:
healthinformatics@duke.edu