AMIA 2018 Presentation Types

The AMIA 2018 Annual Symposium will consider seven types of submissions: (1) Papers; (2) Student Papers; (3) Podium Abstracts; (4) Posters; (5) Panels; (6) Systems Demonstrations; and (7) Pre-symposium Workshops. The general requirements for each type are listed here.

All submissions must conform to the format and presentation requirements described herein. Specific file formatting requirements as well as an example template are given below in the submission instructions section. Each submission should have up to three associated keywords to help in the selection of well-matched reviewers as well as organization of meeting sessions.

IMPORTANT! Deviation from the prescribed format, especially the number of pages and modifications of template margins or font sizes, may result in rejection of the submission without review. Except for podium abstracts, submitted work must be original and not previously published.

The same presentation content cannot be submitted simultaneously as different presentation types (i.e., it cannot be submitted as both a poster and as a podium abstract).

Sample templates: [Word] [LaTex]

Papers

Papers from all areas of biomedical informatics will be considered, with particular emphasis on those that align with the content themes for the AMIA 2018 Annual Symposium. Authors of accepted papers will have 18 minutes to present their work at the symposium including any question and answer period.

An individual may be a first author of only one paper submitted for consideration. Papers must not be in press or under consideration for presentation or publication elsewhere.

Papers must be formatted to be 5-10 pages (US Letter; 8.5 x 11 inch) in length and include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of all authors
  • An abstract of 125-150 words summarizing the submission, which should also be entered into a text box in Step 2 of the online submission form
  • Optional illustrations (figures or tables)
  • References, if applicable
  • A CV for the primary author will need to be uploaded as a separate file (“NIH-style” bio-sketch is preferred).

Student Papers

Students are invited to submit papers that describe complete or nearly complete research or development efforts in informatics that was primarily carried out by the student. All designated student papers follow paper format requirements and will first be reviewed through the standard review process, along with all other submitted papers. Student papers that are accepted will be presented in a regular paper session and included in the Annual Symposium Proceedings.

An individual may be a first author of only one student paper submitted for consideration. Student papers must not be in press or under consideration for presentation or publication elsewhere. Papers can only be submitted as a student paper or a regular paper, not both.

Individuals, who as of March 1, 2018, are enrolled in a degree granting program or in an academic program, such as a medical residency or a post-doctoral fellowship, are eligible to enter a paper into the Student Paper Competition. Work performed as part of a large, collaborative effort is acceptable; however, the student paper will be judged on the student’s specific contributions to the project, which must be clearly delineated. Only individual students, not groups, may submit papers for consideration in the Student Paper Competition. Preparation of a manuscript must be entirely the work of the student, and single authorship is strongly encouraged. Co-authorship is usually limited to the student’s primary advisor. Entries from international students are encouraged. Papers submitted for consideration in the Student Paper Competition must adhere to the same requirements as described in the Papers category and, in addition, student authors must provide:

  • The name and address of the training program
  • Clear identification of the primary advisor of the student submitting the paper
  • All co-authors and a description of that particular author's contribution to the work
  • An attestation of the student's contribution to the manuscript with respect to the following items: (a) The text of the manuscript itself; (b) The data collected for any analysis; (c) The actual data analysis; (d) The review of the literature; (e) If a system was developed, the role of the student in the coding/development of the system; and (f) The evaluation of the results and the formation of the conclusion
  • The student will be asked to upload a PDF of the attestation letter signed by their primary advisor confirming items a-f above

Podium Abstracts

The podium abstract format allows for the presentation of cutting-edge unpublished research that the author wishes to reserve publication rights for future consideration or outstanding work previously published in a peer-reviewed journal. Priority will be given to previously unpublished work. Authors of accepted podium abstracts will have up to 18 minutes to present their work at the symposium including any questions and discussion.

An individual may be the first author of only one podium abstract submitted for consideration in this category. 

Abstracts will not be indexed in MEDLINE, enabling authors to submit their best work that is destined for future journal publication. Contributions may also consist of abstracts based on work published in peer-reviewed journals in the last year (i.e., publication after March 2017); however, works published as proceedings for other conferences will not be accepted. Citation of the previous work is required.

Submissions must be submitted as a two-page (US Letter; 8.5 x 11 inch) document and include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of all authors
  • A structured abstract must be submitted that includes the following sections:
    • Introduction – A short background and objective(s) of the study
    • Methods – Design, setting (if appropriate), patients or participants (if appropriate), interventions (if appropriate), and main outcome measurement
    • Results – Key findings
    • Discussion – Key Conclusions with direct reference to the foundational advancement or biomedical application of the work
    • Optional illustrations (figures or tables)
    • References
    • All podium abstract submissions must have a brief (50-75 words) abstract. The abstract paragraph does NOT have to be part of the document, but must be entered on the submission website in the Abstract box in Step 2 of the online submission form.

Posters

Posters are the preferred format for presenting preliminary research or results of small-scale studies, illustrating and discussing innovative systems and services, describing experimental and in-practice projects and programs, reporting experiences with educational programs, and other dimensions of biomedical and health informatics. The poster sessions have been an increasingly vibrant and popular component of the symposium, offering direct access to the authors in a way not possible through podium presentations. Each accepted poster is displayed during one of the 90-minute poster sessions at the symposium. At least one author must be present at the poster session.

An individual may be a first author of only one submission for a poster presentation. Posters must reflect new work, and not reflect work that is in press or previously published elsewhere.

Your uploaded poster manuscript file must be submitted as a one-page (US Letter; 8.5 x 11 inch) document and include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of all authors.
  • A description of the problem addressed and specific purposes of the system, service, or project; or, in the case of original research, an overview of the methodology, evaluation results, and conclusions
  • Optional illustrations (figures or tables), which must fit in the one-page limit
  • References, if applicable
  • All poster submissions must have a brief (50-75 words) abstract. The abstract does NOT have to be part of the document, but must be entered on the submission website in the Abstract box in Step 2. (Please DO NOT copy and paste the entire one-page document into that box)

Panels

There are two styles of panel presentations: (1) traditional (Didactic), and (2) active discussion (Interactive).

An individual may be the primary organizer of only one panel and may not participate on more than two panels total.

Institutional and gender diversity of the panelists is strongly encouraged.

Didactic Panel

Didactic Panel topics may be on a specific aspect of theory, application, or experience pertaining to any aspect of biomedical or health informatics, or may provide viewpoints that cut across traditional themes. Panels should have no more than four participants and a moderator (five people total). Panel sessions will typically consist of three 15 minute presentations, each followed by five minutes of questions, with 10 minutes for closing discussion. Panels are 90 minutes and panels should submit a list of discussion points that will be included in the last 30 minutes of the panel session to increase audience participation.

The uploaded panel manuscript file must not exceed a maximum of three pages (US Letter; 8.5 x 11 inch) and include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of the panel organizer and all participants.
  • An abstract of 150-200 words, describing the panel and its learning objectives, which should also be entered into a text box at the beginning of the online form to be used in the online and print programs.
  • A general description of the panel and the issue(s) that will be examined and a brief description of each panelist's presentation.
  • An explanation why the topic of this panel is timely, urgent, needed, or attention grabbing is required with a discussion of anticipated audience.
  • A list of discussion questions to enhance audience participation.
  • A statement from the panel organizer that all participants have agreed to take part on the panel.
  • A CV for each presenter will need to be uploaded as separate files (“NIH-style” bio-sketch is preferred).

Interactive Panel

This panel format aims to create an interactive event between the organizers and an active audience. To qualify for an Interactive Panel, the proposal must include a topic that is either controversial or is deemed to elicit varying opinions and questions, as well as active discussions. The Interactive Panel format is a short introduction by a moderator and positions statements of no more than four speakers to engage the audience (five people total). The Panel’s topic can be broad and potential topic include:

  • Discussion of a scientific topic or a topic of emerging importance to the informatics community.
  • Exploration of experiences including challenges in professional collaboration, unintended consequences, ethical dilemmas, or legal jurisdictions as a result of the application of informatics.
  • Exploration of novel technologies or applications that have the potential to be disruptive to the science or application of clinical informatics.
  • Discussion of political, societal, ethical aspects of health information technology, clinical informatics research, or recent technical developments.

The uploaded panel manuscript file must not exceed a maximum of three pages (US Letter; 8.5 x 11 inch) and must include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of the panel organizer and all participants.
  • An abstract of 150-200 words, describing the panel and its goals, which should also be entered into a text box at the beginning of the online form to be used in the online and print programs
  • The proposal should include a description of the intended audience, an introduction of the topic, the aim of the discussion, the specific contribution of each speaker, and expected discussion.
  • An explanation for the timeliness of the proposed topic of this panel is required.
  • A statement from the panel organizer that all participants have agreed to take part on the panel.
  • A CV for each presenter will need to be uploaded as separate files (“NIH-style” bio-sketch is preferred).

Systems Demonstrations

Systems demonstrations illustrate one or more aspects of a leading edge system that is in use, under development, or at a testing or prototype stage. Each demonstration is 30 minutes long, with an additional 15 minutes for audience questions and comments.

An individual may be a first author of only one proposal for a systems demonstration.

Your uploaded systems demonstration manuscript file must be submitted as a one page (US Letter; 8.5 x 11 inch) document and must include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of all presenters
  • An abstract of 150-200 words summarizing the proposal, which will also be entered into a text box at the beginning of the online form to be used in the online and print programs. The abstract does NOT have to be part of the document, but must be entered on the submission website in the Abstract box in Step 2. (Please DO NOT copy and paste the entire one-page document into that box)
  • A description of the specific purposes of the system, service, or project; the problems in health care practice, biomedicine, or research in informatics that it is designed to address; and the purpose or features of the system, service, or project that make it particularly innovative
  • A statement of the degree to which the system or service has been deployed, as of the date of submitting the proposal

Pre-Symposium Workshops

Half-day (3-hour) and full-day (6-hour) workshops are dedicated to in-depth treatment and collaborative discussion of special topics and interests of relevance to the broad biomedical informatics community.  These workshops are divided into two categories: (1) Instructional Workshops, focusing on knowledge base and competency development by participants; and (2) Collaborative Workshops, intended to support the creation and ongoing activities of communities-of-practice within AMIA.

Instructional Workshops are limited to 3 hours in length, and should include a combination of didactic and interactive content delivery, as well as participant interaction. Such workshops should be designed to address the needs and interests of individuals at all levels of experience relative to the selected topic area(s), and be led by individuals with appropriate subject matter expertise. The SPC encourages proposals that will bring together individuals with similar or different roles in developing, implementing, or using informatics in practice, management, education, research, or policy. Further, the SPC seeks a balance between workshops that address essential core informatics theory and principles, with those that address practical applications, current issues, and emerging trends and developments in informatics, aligned with overall meeting themes.

Collaborative Workshops may be either 3 or 6 hours in length, and are intended to encourage participation and collaboration using mechanisms such as discussion forums (e.g., shorter didactic presentations or panels followed by group discussions), research forums (e.g., presentations and discussions related to scientific advancements in a targeted areas of informatics innovation and practice), or a challenge/competition (e.g., individual or group submissions addressing a specific topic or scientific/technical challenge).

Individuals submitting either type of workshop proposal are encouraged to coordinate their activities and submissions with one or more AMIA Working Groups (WGs) as a means of raising the profile of WGs and their constituents at the Annual Symposium. 

The SPC may ask individuals proposing thematically similar workshops in an independent manner to integrate their submissions prior to acceptance.

In recognition of AMIA’s commitment to diversity, individuals submitting workshop proposals are encouraged to ensure that participating members represent a diversity of gender, race, ethnicity, as well as career level and thematic expertise as relevant to the topic of the workshop. Inclusion of students in workshops is especially encouraged. Diversity will be a consideration by the SPC when evaluating proposals.

Individuals proposing workshops should be available to present on Saturday, November 3, or Sunday, November 4, and should confirm their availability on each of those days.

Workshop proposals must not exceed a maximum of four pages (US Letter; 8.5 x 11 inch) in length and include the following information:

  • A descriptive title for the workshop
  • An indication of the workshop type (i.e., instructional or collaborative) and suggested length for collaborative workshop proposals (3 or 6 hours)
  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state/province, and country, if international) of all workshop faculty
  • A summary of 250 to 300 words that describes the content of the workshop
  • An outline of topics to be covered and description of interactive components of the workshop
  • Specific educational objectives or outcomes that participants can expect to achieve
  • A description of who should attend (e.g., clinicians, educators, leaders in healthcare or other organizations, researchers, policy makers, IT professionals)
  • A description of prerequisites knowledge that participant should have, if any
  • Experience of the workshop instructors/leaders in in the targeted content areas
  • If applicable, an indication of WG affiliations for the workshop (including the names of the individuals within each WG providing a formal endorsement of the submission)

A curriculum vitae or bio-sketch for all workshop leaders will need to be uploaded as a separate file with the primary submission.