AMIA 2017 Programmatic Themes

AMIA 2017 will be primarily organized around the five major areas of biomedical informatics, which reflect the spectrum of biomedical research and practice, from molecules to populations. Authors will be required to select one major thematic area of emphasis for their submission:

  • Translational Bioinformatics: The development of storage, analytic, and interpretive methods to optimize the transformation of increasingly voluminous biomedical data, and genomic data, into proactive, predictive, preventive, and participatory health. Translational bioinformatics includes research on the development of novel techniques for the integration of biological and clinical data and the evolution of clinical informatics methodology to encompass biological observations. The end product of translational bioinformatics is newly found knowledge from these integrative efforts that can be disseminated to a variety of stakeholders, including biomedical scientists, clinicians, and patients.
  • Clinical Research Informatics: the use of informatics in the discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. It includes management of information related to clinical trials and also involves informatics related to secondary research use of clinical data. Clinical research informatics and translational bioinformatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities to support translational research.
  • Clinical Informatics: The use of informatics in the discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. It includes management of information related to clinical trials and also involves informatics related to secondary research use of clinical data. Clinical research informatics and translational bioinformatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities to support translational research.Findings related to the design, development, and implementation and maintenance of state-of-the-art clinical systems, including electronic health records, standards and interoperability, clinical decision support, and effects on clinical quality, safety, and patient outcomes.
  • Consumer Health Informatics: Devoted to informatics focusing on multiple consumer or patient views. These include patient-focused informatics, health literacy and consumer education. The focus is on information structures and processes that empower consumers to manage their own health – for example health information literacy, consumer-friendly language, personal health records, mHealth, and Internet-based strategies and resources. The shift in this view of informatics analyzes consumers' needs for information; studies and implements methods for making information accessible to consumers; and models and integrates consumers' preferences into health information systems. Consumer informatics stands at the crossroads of other disciplines, such as nursing informatics, public health, health promotion, health education, library science, and communication science.
  • Public Health Informatics: Applications of informatics in areas of public or population health, including surveillance, prevention, preparedness, and health promotion. The scope of public health is broad, focusing on the health of people and communities where they live, learn, work and play. Informatics applied to public health can therefore take many forms, including interoperable information systems to analyze data for biosurveillance, inform outbreak management in a community, provide immunization decision support, evaluate public health programs, model the spread of disease, and create understanding into the epidemiology of disease.