• Nov 4 - 8, Washington, D.C.

    AMIA 2017 Annual Symposium

    Precision Informatics for Health: The Right Informatics
    for the Right Person at the Right Time

AMIA 2017 Keynotes

Opening Keynote Speaker 

Sunday, November 5, 2017, 1:30 – 3:00 PM

Eric Dishman     @ericdishman

Director, All of Us Research Program, National Institutes of Health

Eric Dishman is the Director of the All of Us Research Program at the National Institutes of Health. In this role, he leads efforts to build a research cohort of one million U.S. participants to advance precision medicine.

Previously, Dishman was an Intel Fellow and Vice President of the Health and Life Sciences Group at Intel Corporation, where he was responsible for driving Intel’s cross-business strategy, research and development, and product and policy initiatives for health and life science solutions.

He is widely recognized as a global leader in health care innovation with specific expertise in home and community-based technologies and services for chronic disease management and independent living. Trained as a social scientist, Dishman is known for pioneering innovation techniques that incorporate anthropology, ethnography, and other social science methods into the development of new technologies. He also brings his own experience as a cancer patient for 23 years—finally cured thanks to precision medicine—to drive a person-centric view of health care transformation.

Closing Keynote Speaker 

Wednesday, November 8, 2017, 12:15 – 1:30 PM

Chris Wiggins, PhD          @chrishwiggins
Columbia University

Chris Wiggins is an associate professor of applied mathematics at Columbia University and the Chief Data Scientist at The New York Times.

At Columbia he is a founding member of the executive committee of the Data Science Institute, and of the Department of Systems Biology, and is affiliated faculty in Statistics.

He is a co-founder and co-organizer of hackNY (http://hackNY.org), a nonprofit which since 2010 has organized once a semester student hackathons and the hackNY Fellows Program, a structured summer internship at NYC startups.

Prior to joining the faculty at Columbia he was a Courant Instructor at NYU (1998-2001) and earned his PhD at Princeton University (1993-1998) in theoretical physics.

He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and is a recipient of Columbia's Avanessians Diversity Award.