• November 16-20, Washington, DC

    AMIA 2013 Annual Symposium

AMIA 2013 President’s Picks Sessions

The specific time and date of all sessions, speakers names and abstracts are available in the Itinerary Planner. It is an excellent tool for building your AMIA 2013 Symposium experience.

 

Six sessions are scheduled:

  • PP1: The Medical Subspecialty of Clinical Informatics: Certification and Serving the Training Needs of Programs
  • PP2: The Debate – Leave Me Alone or Everyone Unknown: Is it Now Time for a Unique National Personal Identifier for Care and Research?
  • PP3: Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA)
  • PP4: Innovations in Standards & Standards Development – What you Might Have Missed in 2013, and Will Need to Know Next Year
  • PP5: Preparing the Health IT Workforce of the Future - Panel
  • PP6: Integrating Genomic Data into the EHR: The eMERGE Experience

Sunday, November 17
3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

PP1: The Medical Subspecialty of Clinical Informatics: Certification and Serving the Training Needs of Programs

Kevin Fickenscher, AMIA; Lorraine C. Lewis, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME); Denece Kesler, William Greaves, American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM)

The medical subspecialty of Clinical Informatics is now a reality with the first sitting of the examination occurring in October through the ABPM. The program requirements for fellowship are being developed by the ACGME. AMIA has been involved in activating informatics programs and has also provided Board of Directors approved feedback to ACGME. Eligibility to sit for the examination is through a Practice Pathway for the first 5 years of the examination, 2013-2017. This session will discuss specifics regarding the requirements for acceptance as a candidate to sit for the initial certification examination, as well as general information about the four parts required for recertification under Maintenance of Certification: professionalism, lifelong learning, cognitive examination, and practice performance. Lorraine Lewis will discuss the latest developments around ACGME-accredited clinical informatics fellowships . The ABPM is a member Board of the American Board of Medical Specialties. The ABPM currently offers certification in the specialty areas of Aerospace Medicine, Occupational Medicine, and Public Health/General Preventive Medicine and in the subspecialty areas of Clinical Informatics, Medical Toxicology and of Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine. Dr. Lewis is the Executive Director of RCs for Anesthesiology, Preventive Medicine, Transitional Year, and oversees the Clinical Informatics training requirements within ACGME.

Monday, November 18
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

PP2: The Debate – Leave Me Alone or Everyone Unknown: Is it Now Time for a Unique National Personal Identifier for Care and Research?

Moderator: Ross Martin, AMIA
For: David Stumpf, Pervasive Health; Don Detmer, University of Virginia
Against: Marc Overhage, Siemens Healthcare;
Patricia Flatley Brennan, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Following the 2012 AMIA Policy Conference, an ad hoc group has developed a Share to Care and Cure (S2C2) Initiative advocating federal policy to 1) allow access to identifiable personal health information for research purposes with ability of citizens to opt-out with no questions asked, and 2) be assigned a unique health identifier for research purposes to improve authentication for greater accuracy and reliability of record data. In the late 1980s the AMIA Board formally agreed to advocate for a unique health identifier to the federal government. This policy position has never been overturned. Is it time for AMIA to once again advocate for a unique health identifier for care and research purposes and if so, what kind of standard should it support under what conditions, and how could it be used? Informatics thought leaders will go head-to-head in a debate-style session to argue the case. At the conclusion, the audience will decide which side made the most convincing argument.

Monday, November 18
10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

PP3: Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) Workgroup Recommendations

David Bates, Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Paul Tang, Palo Alto Medical Foundation; Bradley Thompson, Epstein Becker Green

The Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) of 2012 called for the HHS Secretary to “post a report—within 18 months (or by January 2014)—that contains a proposed strategy and recommendations on a risk-based regulatory framework pertaining to health IT, including mobile applications, that promotes innovation, protects patient safety, and avoids regulatory duplication”.

The FDASIA workgroup issued its final report to the HIT Policy Committee on 9/4/2013. The panel—comprised of workgroup members--will describe the committee process, issues addressed and the recommendations of the committee around how the federal government should proceed with respect to regulation of health IT. The panel will discuss what was considered in and out of scope for risk-based regulation, a proposed framework for risk and innovation, some of the current regulatory approaches, some dimensions a new regulatory framework might include, and the overall recommendations of the FDASIA workgroup.

Tuesday, November 19
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

PP4: Innovations in Standards & Standards Development - What you Might Have Missed in 2013, and Will Need to Know Next Year

Doug Fridsma, ONC; Robert Dolin, Lantana Group; Christopher Chute, Mayo Clinic; Stan Huff, Intermountain Healthcare; Rebecca Kush, CDISC; Charles Jaffe HL7

The simple unambiguous sharing of healthcare data is insufficient to meet the needs of our delivery systems if we are to improve quality and reduce costs. Traditional standards development processes are too slow and inefficient. Moreover, the means for exchanging data has not facilitated data reuse for a broad range of purposes, including quality evaluation, decision support, clinical research, primary medical science application, public health, and comparative effectiveness. The standards needed to support these goals must rapidly evolve despite an environment constrained by the limited availability of resources, by government regulation and by a rapidly evolving knowledge base. Standards development and the organizations that provide those standards are applying innovative approaches to achieving these demands.

Tuesday, November 19
10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

PP5: Preparing the Health IT Workforce of the Future - Panel

Judy Murphy, ONC; William Hersh, Oregon Health & Science University; Norma Morganti, Midwest Community College Health IT Consortium, Cuyahoga Community College; Paul Grundy, Healthcare Transformation

Health IT implementation thus far has focused on electronic data capture and information exchange; we are only beginning to understand the power of health IT as a tool to truly transform our health care system. So as we grapple with clinical and payment reform models like patient-entered medical home (PCMH) and accountable care organizations (ACO), it is important to not only understand the role of IT when implementing these models in care settings, but also to consider the changes required for preparing our future health IT workforce. Panelists will address these changes, as well as describe the importance of incorporating topics such as patient engagement, inter-collaboratory practice and big data analytics into health IT training.

Tuesday, November 19
3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

PP6: Integrating Genomic Data into the EHR: The eMERGE Experience

Joseph Kannry, Mount Sinai Medical Center; Marc S. Williams, Geisinger Health System; Christopher G. Chute, Mayo Clinic; Joshua C Denny, Vanderbilt University; Abel N. Kho, Northwestern University; Peter Tarczy-Hornoch, University of Washington

The panel will take advantage of the research and experience of the eMERGE network to review and discuss challenges in and solutions for integrating genomic data into the HER. The NHGRI-sponsored eMERGE (Electronic Medical Records and Genomics) Network is a federally funded consortium of nine institutions with unique and valuable pioneer experience using a variety of commercial and home-grown EHRs. One of the major foci of the eMERGE network which has been actively researching issues that shed light on the integration of genomic information into the EHR. Specifically the panelists will use the papers in the special issue of Genetics in Medicine October 2013 as a starting point to review the challenges and solutions to this very much needed integration. The panel comprising well known and long time AMIA members looks forward to interacting with the audience to explore challenges, solutions, and partnerships.