• November 3-7, Chicago

    AMIA 2012 Annual Symposium

    Informatics: Transforming Health and Healthcare

AMIA Industry Showcase Presentations

Sunday, November 4

6:15 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. CAP-STS

Understanding the Five Critical Stages that Enable Enterprise Clinical Information Maturity

Paloma Hawry

The College of American Pathologists (CAP) Professional Services group, a recognized leader in clinical data standardization, will introduce a framework that identifies five critical stages to enterprise clinical information maturity and electronic health record optimization. These stages represent critical pathways to help provider organizations: assess enterprise information maturity; build the foundational information practices and capabilities needed to achieve clinical knowledge excellence; use information effectively to measure and drive clinical performance and outcome improvement; and maximize EHR investment value.

 

Monday, November 5

10:15 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. IMO/Lantana/Health Fidelity

Validating the True Value of the Semantic Highway

Fritz Hofheinz, Bob Dolin, Dan Riskin, David Alvin

The challenges associated with the transformations of healthcare documentations from template based speech to natural language processing and semantic interoperability will be discussed.

11:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. IMO/University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The IMO Internship Experience

Karen Woodley, Blake Giles, Matt Cardwell

IMO believes that it is important to develop internships that will entice graduates to make medical informatics a career choice for their future. During this presentation, we will show how IMO’s symbiotic relationship with academic institutions, the IMO Internship Experience, has accelerated innovations within healthcare informatics.

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. IMO/AIM

Challenges and Value in Supporting the DSS (Decisions Support Service) at the Point-of-Care

Regis Charlot, Jerilyn Hejmanowski, Susan Nedza

This session discusses the challenges of terminology and terminology management with DSS and how IMO is solving these challenges thus allowing for innovations within the private sector between payers and providers.

12:30 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. IMO/BIDMC

Harvesting 50 Years of Patient History Experience

Regis Charlot, Ivana Naeymi-Rad, Warner Slack

Dr. Warner Slack, Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and his team will be presenting their fifty years of healthcare informatics research and how their work with IMO and interns from the University of Illinois are extracting intelligent information from Dr. Warner’s research to enhance the collection of Patient History information.

1:15 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. IMO

Comprehensive Terminology Services in Support of Informatics Innovation

Regis Charlot, Eric Rose, Chip Masarie

This session will show how IMO’s terminology outsourcing services can support innovations within Medical Informatics. Such innovations include: the empowerment of regional informatics teams, cloud based appliance services, auto coding and IMO’s intelligent search engine.

4:15 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. IMO/Lantana/Health Fidelity

Validating the True Value of the Semantic Highway

Fritz Hofheinz, Bob Dolin, Dan Riskin, David Alvin

The challenges associated with the transformations of healthcare documentations from template based speech to natural language processing and semantic interoperability will be discussed.

5:00 p.m. – 5:45 p.m. IMO

Comprehensive Terminology Services in Support of Informatics Innovation

Regis Charlot, Eric Rose, Chip Masarie

This session will show how IMO’s terminology outsourcing services can support innovations within Medical Informatics. Such innovations include: the empowerment of regional informatics teams, cloud based appliance services, auto coding and IMO’s intelligent search engine.

5:45 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. IMO/BIDMC

Harvesting 50 Years of Patient History Experience

Regis Charlot, Ivana Naeymi-Rad, Warner Slack

Dr. Warner Slack, Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and his team will be presenting their fifty years of healthcare informatics research and how their work with IMO and interns from the University of Illinois are extracting intelligent information from Dr. Warner’s research to enhance the collection of Patient History information.

 

Tuesday, November 6

10:15 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Linguamatics

Text Mining Electronic Health Records to Improve Patient Outcomes

David Milward

Text mining is well proven for taking large amounts of uncoded or coded data and adding value by processing the unstructured text. Use in pharmaceutical research goes back over 10 years, and the technology is seeing increasing use in healthcare. This talk describes how the I2E Text Mining platform differs from standard search and other text mining technologies, and discusses some use cases in healthcare, including categorizing of radiology reports and linking of health data and scientific data.

11:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. FDB (First Databank) Solutions

Medication Management Implications of 2014 Certification Criteria for Electronic Health Record Technology

George Robinson

2014 Certification Criteria for Electronic Health Record Technology places significant emphasis on use of medication management applications and the exchange of medications and medication allergens in an interoperable manner. An overview of medication management requirements, coupled with suggested FDB drug knowledge solutions, will be presented.

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Deloitte

Health Informatics Industry Maturity Survey

Ross Martin

Deloitte will discuss the findings of the Deloitte-AMIA Health Informatics Industry Maturity Survey. The survey, developed jointly by Deloitte Consulting, LLP and AMIA, sought to understand and establish a benchmark for the maturity of health informatics—with a particular focus on the secondary use of clinical data—in the evolving industry sectors of life science, providers, and health plans. This discussion will share findings on: health informatics visioning and strategy norms within industry sectors; health informatics operations and capabilities within industry sectors; needed and planned health informatics capabilities within industry sectors; the use of EHR systems and data for research and other secondary purposes; and penetration of common practices in standards, policies, and information management. Dr. Martin will review the survey methodology, discuss the findings, and share insights on the potential outcomes and impact of the survey as a recurring measurement tool for assessing the maturity of health informatics in the future.

12:30 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. Northrop Grumman

Mobile Clinical Application for the DOD Electronic Health Record

Terry Irgens

Custom Application for Clinicians that simplifies and streamlines the Electronic Health Record (EHR) encounter documentation. This application augments the DOD’s EHR(AHLTA) architecture to seamlessly extend the functionality of the EHR in a mobile capacity, enabling clinicians to work either from their PC or their mobile tablet.

1:15 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Philips Healthcare

Driving Healthcare Intelligence Throughout the Continuum of Care with Standards-based Interoperability

Patricia Katzman

Initiatives around the globe involve healthcare reform to help manage patient care more effectively and affordably. Predictive modeling provides the potential to intervene before patients become critically or chronically ill to help save lives and manage resources effectively. New healthcare delivery models based on knowledge management use clinical information to provide clinical intelligence to reach a number of goals. These goals include improving the health of populations, advancing patient-centered continuity of care, improving the efficiency of providing care, and reducing healthcare costs through such steps as reducing patient readmissions. Interoperability is essential to the smooth flow of data that makes this possible. This paper reviews some basic concepts of interoperability with a focus on IHE (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise) and examples of how interoperability can be used to facilitate the exchange of clinical information across the continuum of care.

4:15 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. nVoq feat. Entrada Health

Driving Practice Innovation Through Voice-Enabled Workflow

Derek Plansky, Chase Pattison

Mr. Plansky and Mr. Pattison will showcase a variety of clinical documentation workflows enabled by web-based voice recognition, including EMR charting, navigation and data entry for popular nursing templates, and seamless data capture from mobile devices. Technology solutions from nVoq (SayIt ™), Mi-Corporation, and Entrada Health will be demonstrated in support of ambulatory, acute and post-acute care scenarios. Potential benefits to the organization such as: increased productivity/efficiency, documentation quality and throughput; improved employee morale, on-boarding and retention; and other practice innovation considerations will also be discussed with the audience in an interactive Q & A format.

5:00 p.m. – 5:45 p.m. RTI International

Quantified Self-Tracking

Robert Furberg, Jonathan Wald

Self-tracking is the regular collection of data that can be measured by individuals about themselves, including objective (e.g., biological, physical, or environmental) and subjective (e.g., behavioral, emotional, qualitative) measures through the use of low-cost, consumer-grade enabling technologies. Monitoring devices are commonly paired with websites or mobile applications that provide users with a feedback loop of rich, interactive graphical presentations, gaming elements (e.g., points, levels, virtual rewards), and other elements that facilitate goal setting, competition, and social support to address both medical issues and general wellness objectives.

During this session we will: examine how the methods and tools created by a Bay Area subculture with a passion for health and a penchant for self-experimentation has become one of the most rapidly growing market sectors in consumer health and wellness spending; described how these tools are being used in practice to empower health promotion, disease prevention, and chronic disease management; and discuss how quantified self-tracking could enable the creation of a registry for self-generated health data to examine the effect of this convergence on population health.

5:45 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Recombinant Data Corp

Data Quality in the Enterprise Data Warehouse

Michael Kamerick

As implementations of Electronic Medical Record systems approach degrees of maturity, many institutions are seeking to maximize the utility of the data captured through a secondary analytic structure such as a data warehouse. By integrating data from disparate systems, a data warehouse can provide new insights into clinical effectiveness, accountability, regulatory compliance, and translational research. Data quality issues are critical to ensuring acceptance of such analytics, since integration of disparate sources invariably introduces conflicting data, and a process for implementing data quality rules during the integration process is essential.

We will examine the challenges of guaranteeing data quality in a warehouse, from policy and governance issues to technical and architectural considerations; and we will relay our experience on a number of relevant projects.

For more information on Corporate partnerships with AMIA, please contact: feedback@amia.org