November 16-20, Washington, DC

AMIA 2013 Annual Symposium

Washington Hilton hotel

AMIA 2013 Call for Participation

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: MARCH 14, 2013, 11:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time

Common Questions about Submissions

Q. I’m trying to log-in with my regular ID, but it doesn’t seem to work. How do I submit?

Please create a NEW login ID if you are having difficulty. We have changed our submission system from Manuscript Central to Abstract Central and regret any inconvenience. Your submission is important to AMIA!

Q. How do I activate the “role” that that will allow me to submit for AMIA 2013?

A. To submit to AMIA 2013 you need to have an active role in each of the submission categories. Roles can be activated under the Welcome Tab by selecting “modify account.”

The key to each role is below:

  • Papers = Papers
  • Posters = Posters
  • Pre-Symposium = Working Group Presymposia and Tutorials
  • Student Papers = Student Papers
  • Other Submissions = State of the Practice, Panels, Podium Abstract Presentation, Systems Demonstration

Annual Symposium Tracks

AMIA 2013 submissions will be categorized as either foundational contributions of novel informatics methods, or as reports of the application of informatics in the biomedical sciences or the day-to-day practice of health care. To help attendees identify sessions in which they are most interested, The SPC will organize accepted submissions into the following themes listed below.

From the time that authors begin to prepare their papers, abstracts, or proposals, they should consider whether their principal results and insights would more aptly be presented as a foundational contribution of novel informatics methods, or as a report of the application of informatics in the biomedical sciences or the day-to-day practice of health care. Contributions that emphasize methods should be submitted to the Foundations of Informatics track, chaired by Katie Siek. Contributions that emphasize specific problems should be submitted to the Applications of Informatics track, chaired by Titus Schleyer. We believe that almost all contributions to AMIA 2013 will have both foundational and pragmatic elements in them, and in many cases the assignment of papers and tracks will be less than obvious. Authors may be in the best position to make a final decision about track at the time they classify their contribution. After classifying his/her submission according to the method(s) employed and problem(s) addressed, authors who believe that the primary contribution of their work relates to the methods employed should submit to the Foundations track. Authors who believe that the primary contribution relates to the problems addressed should submit to the Applications track. All track assignments by authors will be reviewed by the Scientific Program Committee (SPC). The Committee may, in selected cases, change the assignments.

Foundations of Informatics

This track will emphasize conceptual advances relating to the structure, processing, management, and use of biomedical information. This track presents the results of innovative research on the scientific underpinnings of biomedical and health informatics - highlighting the fundamental advances that lead to new methods and, ultimately, to new applications in support of health care, biological research, and education.

Applications of Informatics

This track emphasizes innovations in the design, technology, implementation, use and evaluation of information systems and knowledge resources across the full spectrum of health care - in acute, ambulatory, and chronic care settings, public health departments, libraries, educational centers, and homes. Contributions to this track should emphasize applications that work in the real world to solve important problems.
 


Categories of Submission

The types of submissions considered for AMIA 2013 and general requirements for each are listed on these pages. All submissions must conform to the format and presentation requirements described herein, and at the AMIA 2013 submission site.

State of the Practice Presentations

A new category of submission to the AMIA Annual Symposium in 2013 is the State of the Practice presentation. As one of the goals of the Annual Symposium is to help practitioners translate the science of informatics into real-world practice, these talks will report on the leading evidence-based science-guided practice of informatics. Each talk will be 30 minutes in length plus 15 minutes for discussion. It is expected that each presenter will define a specific area of informatics practice that is relevant to one of the main conference themes and describe how the best science informs optimal practice.

The uploaded manuscript file must not exceed three (8.5 x 11 inch) pages and must include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of all presenters
  • An abstract of 150-200 words summarizing the proposal, which will also be entered into a text box at the beginning of the online form to be used in the online and print programs
  • A description and outline of the proposed presentation, a list of specific educational goals, and a description of who should attend. Full-length papers are not required, and only the abstracts will appear in the conference program.

Papers

SPC solicits paper proposals both on foundational and applied biomedical and health informatics. Authors of accepted papers will have 15 minutes to present their work at the symposium with five minutes for questions and discussion. An individual may be a first author of only one paper submitted for consideration. Proposals must not be in press or under consideration for presentation or publication elsewhere.

In order to better meet the needs of AMIA members, manuscripts should be between 5-10 (8.5 x 11 inch) pages and must include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of all authors
  • An abstract of 125-150 words summarizing the submission, which should also be entered into a text box at the beginning of the online form
  • A brief introduction, background, methods, results, and discussion sections
  • Optional illustrations (figures or tables)
  • References, if applicable
  • A CV for the primary author will need to be uploaded as a separate file (“NIH-style” bio-sketch is preferred).

Student Papers

The SPC invites students to submit papers that describe complete or nearly complete research or development efforts in informatics. All designated student papers follow paper format requirements and will first be reviewed through the SPC’s standard review process, along with all other submitted papers. Student papers that are accepted by the SPC will be presented in a regular paper session and included in the Annual Symposium Proceedings. An individual may be a first author of only one paper submitted for consideration. Proposals must not be in press or under consideration for presentation or publication elsewhere.

In addition, all accepted student papers will be referred to the Student Paper Advisory Committee (SPAC) for consideration for student paper awards. Eight student papers will be selected by the SPAC as finalists for the award competition and these eight papers will be presented at a special session. The eight finalist papers will be presented twice. It is up to the submitting student to ensure that his/her paper is correctly identified as a student paper proposal. Individuals who as of March 1, 2013, are enrolled in a degree granting program or in an academic program such as a medical residency or a post-doctoral fellowship are eligible to enter a paper into the Student Paper Competition. Work performed as part of a large, collaborative effort is acceptable; however, the student paper will be judged on the student’s specific contributions to the project which must be clearly delineated. Only individual students, not groups, may submit papers for consideration in the Student Paper Competition. Preparation of a manuscript must be entirely the work of the student, and single authorship is strongly encouraged. Co-authorship is usually limited to the student’s academic advisor. Entries from international students are encouraged. Papers submitted for consideration in the Student Paper Competition must adhere to the same requirements as described in the papers category, and in addition, student authors must provide in the online form:

  • The name and address of their training program
  • Clear identification of the primary advisor/mentor of the student submitting the paper
  • All co-authors and a description of that particular author's contribution to the work
  • An attestation of the student's contribution to the manuscript with respect to the following items: (a) The text of the manuscript itself; (b) The data collected for any analysis; (c) The actual data analysis; (d) The review of the literature; (e) If a system was developed, the role of the student in the coding/development of the system; and (f) The evaluation of the results and the formation of the conclusion
  • The student will be asked to e-sign an attestation in the online form verifying that all information provided is accurate. This action will generate an email to the primary advisor asking for his/her e-signature as well.

Abstract Presentations

Podium format allows for the presentation of research for which the author wishes to reserve publication rights for future consideration. Authors of accepted abstracts will have up to 15 minutes to present their work at the symposium with five minutes for questions and discussion. An individual may be a first author of only one abstract submitted for consideration in this category. Submissions cannot be under consideration at, or previously presented at, other conferences with published proceedings. Abstracts will not be indexed in Medline, enabling authors to submit their best work that is destined for other journal publications in the future.

Submissions must be submitted as a one-page (8.5 x 11 inch) document and must include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of all authors
  • A brief Introduction and background, methods, results, and discussion
  • One optional Illustration (Figure or Table), which must fit in the one-page limit

Posters

Posters are the preferred format for presenting preliminary research results or results of small scale studies, illustrating and discussing innovative systems and services, describing experimental and in-practice projects and programs, reporting experiences with educational programs, and other dimensions of medical informatics. The poster sessions have been an increasingly vibrant and popular component of the symposium, offering direct access to the authors in a way not possible through podium presentations. Each accepted poster is displayed during one of the 90-minute poster sessions at the symposium. At least one author must be present at the poster session. An individual may be a first author of only one proposal for a poster presentation.

Your uploaded poster manuscript file must be submitted as a one-page (8.5 x 11 inch) document and must include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of all authors.
  • A description of the problem addressed and specific purposes of the system, service, or project; or, in the case of original research, an overview of the methodology, evaluation results, and conclusions
  • Optional illustrations (figures or tables), which must fit in the one-page limit
  • References, if applicable
  • Accepted posters will be presented on poster boards which are 4’ high by 8’ wide

Panels

Panel topics may be on a specific aspect of theory, application, or experience pertaining to any aspect of biomedical or health informatics, or may provide interdisciplinary viewpoints that cut across traditional themes. Panels should be limited to four participants and a moderator. Panel sessions will typically consist of four 15 minute presentations, each followed by 5 minutes of questions, with 10 minutes for closing discussion. An individual may be the primary organizer of only one panel and may not participate on more than two panels total.

Your uploaded panel manuscript file must not exceed a maximum of three (8.5 x 11 inch) pages and must include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of the panel organizer and all participants
  • An abstract of 150-200 words, describing the panel and its learning objectives, which should also be entered into a text box at the beginning of the online form to be used in the online and print programs
  • A general description of the panel and the issue(s) that will be examined and a brief description of each panelist's presentation
  • A statement from the panel organizer that all participants have agreed to take part on the panel.
  • A CV for each presenter will need to be uploaded as separate files (“NIH-style” bio-sketch is preferred).

Systems Demonstrations (formerly Theater-style Demonstrations)

Systems demonstrations are presented during program sessions, and most often illustrate one or more aspects of a leading edge system that is in use, under development, or at a testing or prototype stage. Each demonstration is 30 minutes long, with an additional 15 minutes for audience questions and comments. An individual may be a first author of only one proposal for a systems demonstration.

Your uploaded systems demonstration manuscript file must be submitted as a one page (8.5 x 11 inch) document and must include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of all presenters
  • An abstract of 150-200 words summarizing the proposal, which will also be entered into a text box at the beginning of the online form to be used in the online and print programs
  • A description of the specific purposes of the system, service, or project; the problems in health care practice, biomedicine, or research in informatics that it is designed to address; and the purpose or features of the system, service, or project that make it particularly innovative
  • A statement of the degree to which the system or service has been deployed, as of the date of submitting the proposal

Pre-symposium Tutorials

Half-day and full-day tutorials are dedicated to in-depth treatment of special topics and interests of relevance to informatics. Half-day tutorials include three hours of instruction; full-day tutorials include six hours of instruction. The SPC seeks a balance between tutorials that address essential core informatics theory and principles, with those that address practical applications, current issues, and emerging trends and developments in informatics. Tutorials range from the general introductory level through specialized advanced treatments. All instructors should be available to give their tutorial on Saturday, November 16 or Sunday, November 17, and should confirm their availability on each of those days. AMIA seeks tutorial proposals related to the AMIA 2013 themes.

For both Tutorials and Working Group Pre-symposia, there are 4 full-day slots and 16 half-day slots available on November 16 and 17. Full-day slots are available on November 16 only. The ratio of full-day to half-day slots is subject to change based on submitted content. Expanding the total number of slots available is not possible because space is limited in the hotel.

Presenter Remuneration

There is a $600 stipend for each half-day tutorial and a $1,125 stipend for each full-day tutorial regardless of the number of presenters.

Tutorial proposals must not exceed a maximum of four pages in length and must include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state/province, and country, if international) of all instructors
  • An opening summary of 250 to 300 words that describes the content of the tutorial
  • An outline of topics to be covered
  • Length of tutorial (3 or 6 hours)
  • Specific educational objectives that participants can expect to achieve
  • A description of who should attend (e.g., clinicians, educators, leaders in healthcare or other organizations, researchers, policy makers, IT professionals)
  • An indication of the level or combination of levels of the content (percentage of basic, intermediate, and advanced material covered)
  • A description of prerequisites, if any
  • Experience of instructors in teaching similar content
  • A curriculum vitae or biosketch for each instructor will need to be uploaded as a separate file.

AMIA Working Group Pre-symposia

AMIA would like its Working Groups (WG) to propose 3- or 6-hour programs that will be featured at the Annual Symposium as “Working Group Pre-symposia.” These pre-symposia are a means of raising the profile of AMIA’s WGs at the Annual Symposium and should promote formal discussion among constituents sharing common interests. AMIA encourages proposals that will bring together individuals with similar or different roles in developing, implementing, or using informatics in practice, management, education, research, or policy.

For both Tutorials and Working Group Pre-symposia, there are 4 full-day slots and 16 half-day slots available on November 16 and 17. Full-day slots are available on November 16 only. The ratio of full-day to half-day slots is subject to change based on submitted content. Expanding the total number of slots available is not possible because space is limited in the hotel.

Presenter Remuneration

There is a $600 stipend for each half-day pre-symposium and a $1,125 stipend for each full-day pre-symposium, regardless of the number of presenters.

Your uploaded proposal file must be submitted as up to a three-page (8.5 x 11 inch) document and must include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state/province, country, international) of the organizers and instructors
  • A program title and abstract of 150-200 words summarizing the event, which will also be entered into a text box at the beginning of the online form to be used in the online and print programs
  • A description of the proposed pre-symposia session, how it will be conducted, and a list of specific goals of the workshop
  • A description of who should attend, projected number of attendees, and a short communication and outreach plan to attract existing and prospective working group members as paid attendees.
  • An outline of topics to be covered
  • Length of tutorial (3 or 6 hours of content)

The Submission Process

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: MARCH 14, 2013, 11:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time

All submissions must be made through the submission site.

Complete the online submission form as instructed and attach your submission in compliance with directions provided at the AMIA 2013 submission Web site and Call for Participation.

File Format Requirements

Your manuscript file, as described on the "Select Your Format" page, should be in compliance with the requirements noted below. Papers, posters, and systems demonstrations will appear in the AMIA 2013 Annual Symposium Proceedings. Adherence to the following requirements throughout all categories of submission ensures a consistency that facilitates the review process and proceedings.

  • File should either be in Word or PDF formats only.
  • Be certain to adhere to the page length restrictions stated in the category descriptions.
  • Format for 8.5 x 11 inch paper size with one inch margins left, right, top, and bottom.
  • Place the title in 14 point Times Roman typeface, single column, bold, centered, upper and lower case using initial capitals for each word in the title other than articles and prepositions.
  • Include below the title, the names, credentials, institutions and locations of the author(s) or panelists, exactly as they are to appear in the online and print programs and the Proceedings, using 12 point Times Roman typeface, single column, bold, centered, upper and lower case using appropriate capitals.
  • Include the main text of the submission single-spaced in 10 point Times New Roman typeface, justified, one-column format.
  • Do not number individual pages.
  • Disable track changes in Word before uploading.
  • Download a sample template [MS Word file]

The format of credentials and other author information appearing in the online and printed materials is subject to revision by the AMIA office. It is the responsibility of the first author of each proposal to provide full and accurate information about all authors named.

Reference Format

Use the following reference format: Cite all references in the text, tables, or figure legends. In the text, use eight point superscript if possible to indicate reference numbers; if not possible, use 10 point numbers in square brackets. Under a centered heading “References” at the end of the submission, provide a list of references cited, in order of occurrence in the manuscript, and with titles using initial capital only. References must fit within the allotted page(s). List all authors of any cited work when there are six or fewer authors; if more than six, list only the first three followed by “et al.” Follow the Vancouver Style see www.icmje.org/index.html.

Working Group Submissions

AMIA Working Groups may submit in any one of the categories of submission described in this Call for Participation. Submissions must come from a member of the working group, be sponsored by the working group, and confirmed by the WG Chair, and be clearly identified on the on-line submission form as a specific working group submission. Working group submissions are subject to the same submissions and review requirements, deadlines, and processes as all other submissions in each category. Submissions from WGs should be the product of working group activities that have taken place over the course of the year. Submissions from working groups, while encouraged, are subject to the same review process and standards as other submissions. Acceptance of submissions from working groups is not assured. The AMIA WG Policies & Procedures Manual contains additional details.

Industry Submissions

Industry-authored and industry-client collaborative papers, panels, demonstrations, workshops, and posters are welcome for submission as described above. No special submission designation is required. All industry submissions will follow the existing review processes.

Scope and Breadth of the Annual Symposium

Thoughtful classification of your submission greatly enhances the quality of the review that it receives. Using the forms below, you will select a topic track and three subject axes reflecting the methods employed, goals or problems addressed, and overall health care domain or venue. This classification helps to ensure that each submission is reviewed by persons knowledgeable about its content. In addition, it helps greatly in structuring the meeting sessions, allowing better grouping of papers and presentations by area of interest. For the topic track, generally speaking, contributions emphasizing information science or general methods will be part of the Foundations track, while those emphasizing specific designs or application to healthcare problems should be submitted to the Applications track. We recognize that no classification system is perfect and ask you to use your best judgment in making these determinations. You will be asked to select one area of the classification scheme for Axis I and Axis II along with a Topic Track Category that best describes your submission.

Axis I. METHODS EMPLOYED AND FUNDAMENTAL STRUCTURES USED (FOUNDATIONS TRACK)

I.A. INFORMATION AND KNOWLEDGE REPRESENTATION

I.A.1. Controlled terminologies and vocabularies
I.A.2. Ontologies, knowledge bases, and data models
I.A.3. Knowledge representations, acquisition, and management

I.B. INFORMATION AND KNOWLEDGE PROCESSING

I.B.1. Information storage and retrieval (text and images)
I.B.2. Image representation, processing, analysis, and display
I.B.3. Natural-language processing
I.B.4. Text mining methods
I.B.5. Data mining methods
I.B.6. Other forms of automated learning
I.B.7. Other methods of information extraction
I.B.8. Speech recognition
I.B.9. Text generation from discrete data
I.B.10. Visualization of data and knowledge
I.B.11. Simulation of complex systems (at all levels: molecules to work groups to organizations)
I.B.12. Modeling physiologic and disease processes
I.B.13. Human-computer interaction and human-centered computing
I.B.14. Uncertain reasoning and decision theory
I.B.15. Temporal and Spatial Reasoning
I.B.16. Statistical analysis of large datasets
I.B.17. Software engineering: architecture, agents, distributed systems
I.B.18. Cryptography, anonymization, and other methods for security and policy enforcement
I.B.19. Advanced algorithms, languages, and computational methods
I.B.20. High-performance and large-scale computing
I.B.21. Mobile technology (mHealth)
I.B.22. Intelligent tutoring and tailored information representation
I.B.23. Methods for integration of information from disparate sources
I.B.24. Networking methods
I.B.25. Social media

I.C. EMPIRICAL RESEARCH AND EVALUATION METHODOLOGY

I.C.1. Cognitive study (including experiments emphasizing verbal protocol analysis and usability)
I.C.2. Classical experimental and quasi-experimental study methods (lab and field)
I.C.3. Qualitative/ethnographic field study
I.C.4. Legal, policy, historical, ethical study methods
I.C.5. Surveys and needs analysis
I.C.6. Social/organizational study

I.D. NEW UNDERSTANDINGS OF PEOPLE AND ORGANIZATIONAL ISSUES (POI)

I.D.1. Clinical perspectives
I.D.2. Public health perspectives
I.D.3. Consumer health perspectives
I.D.4. Researcher perspectives

Axis II. DIRECT APPLICATIONS, GOALS, OR PROBLEMS ADDRESSED (APPLICATIONS TRACK)

II.1. Data exchange, communication, and integration across care settings (inter- and intra-enterprise standards)
II.2. Developing and refining EHR Data standards (including image standards)
II.3. Supporting practice at a distance (telehealth)
II.4. Assuring information system security and personal privacy
II.5 Designing usable (responsive) resources and systems
II.6 Developing/using computerized provider order entry
II.7 Other specific EHR applications (results review, medication administration, disease progression, and image management)
II.8 Systems to support and improve diagnostic accuracy
II.9 Developing/using clinical decision support (other than diagnostic) and guideline systems
II.10 Planning, Scheduling, and Plan Application
II.11. Mobile health (mHealth), web 2.0, social media
II.12. System implementation and management issues
II.13. Measuring/improving patient safety and reducing medical errors
II.14. Measuring/improving outcomes in specific conditions and patient subgroups
II.15. Improving healthcare workflow and process efficiency
II.16. Demonstrating return on IT investment
II.17. Improving government and community policy relevant to informatics and health quality
II.18. Detecting disease outbreaks & biological threats
II.19. Monitoring the health of populations
II.20. Delivering health information and knowledge to the public
II.21. Consumer health informatics (includes personal health records and self-care systems)
II.22. Systems supporting patient-provider interaction
II.23. Identifying genome and protein structure and function
II.24. Linking the genotype and phenotype
II.25. Identifying, representing, and modeling biological structures
II.26. Translational research - application of biological knowledge to clinical care
II.27. Providing just-in-time access to the biomedical literature & other health information
II.28. Applications that link biomedical knowledge from diverse primary sources (includes automated indexing)
II.29. Enhancing the conduct of biological/clinical research and trials
II.30. Establishment of digital multi-media or image libraries
II.31. Improving the education and skills training of health professionals
II.32. Global health informatics/informatics in resource-poor settings